Samsung Genome Institute

2020
Yun JW, Yang L, Park H-Y, Lee C-W, Cha H, Shin H-T, Noh K-W, Choi Y-L, Park W-Y**, Park PJ**. Dysregulation of cancer genes by recurrent intergenic fusions. Genome Biol 2020;21(1):166.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Gene fusions have been studied extensively, as frequent drivers of tumorigenesis as well as potential therapeutic targets. In many well-known cases, breakpoints occur at two intragenic positions, leading to in-frame gene-gene fusions that generate chimeric mRNAs. However, fusions often occur with intergenic breakpoints, and the role of such fusions has not been carefully examined. RESULTS: We analyze whole-genome sequencing data from 268 patients to catalog gene-intergenic and intergenic-intergenic fusions and characterize their impact. First, we discover that, in contrast to the common assumption, chimeric oncogenic transcripts-such as those involving ETV4, ERG, RSPO3, and PIK3CA-can be generated by gene-intergenic fusions through splicing of the intervening region. Second, we find that over-expression of an upstream or downstream gene by a fusion-mediated repositioning of a regulatory sequence is much more common than previously suspected, with enhancers sometimes located megabases away. We detect a number of recurrent fusions, such as those involving ANO3, RGS9, FUT5, CHI3L1, OR1D4, and LIPG in breast; IGF2 in colon; ETV1 in prostate; and IGF2BP3 and SIX2 in thyroid cancers. CONCLUSION: Our findings elucidate the potential oncogenic function of intergenic fusions and highlight the wide-ranging consequences of structural rearrangements in cancer genomes.
2017
Cortes-Ciriano I*, Lee S*, Park W-Y, Kim T-M**, Park PJ**. A molecular portrait of microsatellite instability across multiple cancers. Nat Commun 2017;8:15180.Abstract
Microsatellite instability (MSI) refers to the hypermutability of short repetitive sequences in the genome caused by impaired DNA mismatch repair. Although MSI has been studied for decades, large amounts of sequencing data now available allows us to examine the molecular fingerprints of MSI in greater detail. Here, we analyse ∼8,000 exomes and ∼1,000 whole genomes of cancer patients across 23 cancer types. Our analysis reveals that the frequency of MSI events is highly variable within and across tumour types. We also identify genes in DNA repair and oncogenic pathways recurrently subject to MSI and uncover non-coding loci that frequently display MSI. Finally, we propose a highly accurate exome-based predictive model for the MSI phenotype. These results advance our understanding of the genomic drivers and consequences of MSI, and our comprehensive catalogue of tumour-type-specific MSI loci will enable panel-based MSI testing to identify patients who are likely to benefit from immunotherapy.
Kim ST, Kim K-M, Kim NKD, Park JO, Ahn S, Yun J-W, Kim K-T, Park SH, Park PJ, Kim HC, Sohn TS, Choi DI, Cho JH, Heo JS, Kwon W, Lee H, Min B-H, Hong SN, Park YS, Lim HY, Kang WK, Park W-Y, Lee J. Clinical Application of Targeted Deep Sequencing in Solid-Cancer Patients and Utility for Biomarker-Selected Clinical Trials. Oncologist 2017;22(10):1169-1177.Abstract
Molecular profiling of actionable mutations in refractory cancer patients has the potential to enable "precision medicine," wherein individualized therapies are guided based on genomic profiling. The molecular-screening program was intended to route participants to different candidate drugs in trials based on clinical-sequencing reports. In this screening program, we used a custom target-enrichment panel consisting of cancer-related genes to interrogate single-nucleotide variants, insertions and deletions, copy number variants, and a subset of gene fusions. From August 2014 through April 2015, 654 patients consented to participate in the program at Samsung Medical Center. Of these patients, 588 passed the quality control process for the 381-gene cancer-panel test, and 418 patients were included in the final analysis as being eligible for any anticancer treatment (127 gastric cancer, 122 colorectal cancer, 62 pancreatic/biliary tract cancer, 67 sarcoma/other cancer, and 40 genitourinary cancer patients). Of the 418 patients, 55 (12%) harbored a biomarker that guided them to a biomarker-selected clinical trial, and 184 (44%) patients harbored at least one genomic alteration that was potentially targetable. This study demonstrated that the panel-based sequencing program resulted in an increased rate of trial enrollment of metastatic cancer patients into biomarker-selected clinical trials. Given the expanding list of biomarker-selected trials, the guidance percentage to matched trials is anticipated to increase. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: This study demonstrated that the panel-based sequencing program resulted in an increased rate of trial enrollment of metastatic cancer patients into biomarker-selected clinical trials. Given the expanding list of biomarker-selected trials, the guidance percentage to matched trials is anticipated to increase.
Shin H-T*, Choi Y-L*, Yun JW*, Kim NKD*, Kim S-Y, Jeon HJ, Nam J-Y, Lee C, Ryu D, Kim SC, Park K, Lee E, Bae JS, Son DS, Joung J-G, Lee J, Kim ST, Ahn M-J, Lee S-H, Ahn JS, Lee WY, Oh BY, Park YH, Lee JE, Lee KH, Kim HC, Kim K-M, Im Y-H, Park K, Park PJ**, Park W-Y**. Prevalence and detection of low-allele-fraction variants in clinical cancer samples. Nat Commun 2017;8(1):1377.Abstract
Accurate detection of genomic alterations using high-throughput sequencing is an essential component of precision cancer medicine. We characterize the variant allele fractions (VAFs) of somatic single nucleotide variants and indels across 5095 clinical samples profiled using a custom panel, CancerSCAN. Our results demonstrate that a significant fraction of clinically actionable variants have low VAFs, often due to low tumor purity and treatment-induced mutations. The percentages of mutations under 5% VAF across hotspots in EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF are 16%, 11%, 12%, and 10%, respectively, with 24% for EGFR T790M and 17% for PIK3CA E545. For clinical relevance, we describe two patients for whom targeted therapy achieved remission despite low VAF mutations. We also characterize the read depths necessary to achieve sensitivity and specificity comparable to current laboratory assays. These results show that capturing low VAF mutations at hotspots by sufficient sequencing coverage and carefully tuned algorithms is imperative for a clinical assay.
2016
Yang L*, Lee M-S*, Lu H*, Oh D-Y, Kim YJ, Park D, Park G, Ren X, Bristow CA, Haseley PS, Lee S, Pantazi A, Kucherlapati R, Park W-Y, Scott KL**, Choi Y-L**, Park PJ**. Analyzing Somatic Genome Rearrangements in Human Cancers by Using Whole-Exome Sequencing. Am J Hum Genet 2016;98(5):843-56.Abstract

Although exome sequencing data are generated primarily to detect single-nucleotide variants and indels, they can also be used to identify a subset of genomic rearrangements whose breakpoints are located in or near exons. Using >4,600 tumor and normal pairs across 15 cancer types, we identified over 9,000 high confidence somatic rearrangements, including a large number of gene fusions. We find that the 5' fusion partners of functional fusions are often housekeeping genes, whereas the 3' fusion partners are enriched in tyrosine kinases. We establish the oncogenic potential of ROR1-DNAJC6 and CEP85L-ROS1 fusions by showing that they can promote cell proliferation in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. Furthermore, we found that ∼4% of the samples have massively rearranged chromosomes, many of which are associated with upregulation of oncogenes such as ERBB2 and TERT. Although the sensitivity of detecting structural alterations from exomes is considerably lower than that from whole genomes, this approach will be fruitful for the multitude of exomes that have been and will be generated, both in cancer and in other diseases.

Nam J-Y, Kim NKD, Kim SC, Joung J-G, Xi R, Lee S, Park PJ**, Park W-Y**. Evaluation of somatic copy number estimation tools for whole-exome sequencing data. Brief Bioinform 2016;17(2):185-92.Abstract

Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has become a standard method for detecting genetic variants in human diseases. Although the primary use of WES data has been the identification of single nucleotide variations and indels, these data also offer a possibility of detecting copy number variations (CNVs) at high resolution. However, WES data have uneven read coverage along the genome owing to the target capture step, and the development of a robust WES-based CNV tool is challenging. Here, we evaluate six WES somatic CNV detection tools: ADTEx, CONTRA, Control-FREEC, EXCAVATOR, ExomeCNV and Varscan2. Using WES data from 50 kidney chromophobe, 50 bladder urothelial carcinoma, and 50 stomach adenocarcinoma patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we compared the CNV calls from the six tools with a reference CNV set that was identified by both single nucleotide polymorphism array 6.0 and whole-genome sequencing data. We found that these algorithms gave highly variable results: visual inspection reveals significant differences between the WES-based segmentation profiles and the reference profile, as well as among the WES-based profiles. Using a 50% overlap criterion, 13-77% of WES CNV calls were covered by CNVs from the reference set, up to 21% of the copy gains were called as losses or vice versa, and dramatic differences in CNV sizes and CNV numbers were observed. Overall, ADTEx and EXCAVATOR had the best performance with relatively high precision and sensitivity. We suggest that the current algorithms for somatic CNV detection from WES data are limited in their performance and that more robust algorithms are needed.

2015
Spatiotemporal Evolution of the Primary Glioblastoma Genome.
Kim J, Lee I-H, Cho HJ, Park C-K, Jung Y-S, Kim Y, Nam SH, Kim BS, Johnson MD, Kong D-S, Seol HJ, Lee J-I, Joo KM, Yoon Y, Park W-Y, Lee J, Park PJ**, Nam D-H**. Spatiotemporal Evolution of the Primary Glioblastoma Genome. Cancer Cell 2015;28(3):318-28.Abstract

Tumor recurrence following treatment is the major cause of mortality for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. Thus, insights on the evolutionary process at recurrence are critical for improved patient care. Here, we describe our genomic analyses of the initial and recurrent tumor specimens from each of 38 GBM patients. A substantial divergence in the landscape of driver alterations was associated with distant appearance of a recurrent tumor from the initial tumor, suggesting that the genomic profile of the initial tumor can mislead targeted therapies for the distally recurred tumor. In addition, in contrast to IDH1-mutated gliomas, IDH1-wild-type primary GBMs rarely developed hypermutation following temozolomide (TMZ) treatment, indicating low risk for TMZ-induced hypermutation for these tumors under the standard regimen.